Compression Levels and Indications

  • Tired, achy legs
  • Occupational or evening edema
  • Leg discomfort from long hours of standing or sitting
  • Prophylaxis for legs predisposed to risk
  • Prophylaxis of DVT during travel
  • Heavy, fatigued, aching legs
  • Mild edema in lower extremities
  • Mild varicosities with minimal edema
  • Mild varicosities during pregnancy
  • Minimal edema upper extremities
  • Post-procedure of small veins
  • Prevention or management of DVT
  • Moderate varicosities with mild to moderate edema (also during pregnancy)
  • Post-precedure of larger veins to maintain treatment success
  • CEAP C3 (edema), C4 (skin changes without ulceration), C5 (skin changes with healed ulceration), C6* (skin changes with active ulcerations)
  • Prevention, management and treatment of DVT or Post-Thrombotic Syndrome
  • Superficial phlebitis
  • Mild lymphedema after decongestant therapy to maintain reduction
  • Orthostatic / postural hypotension
  • Post-fracture, post-traumatic edema
  • Severe varicosities
  • Severe edema
  • Lymphedema after decongestant therapy for reduction maintenance
  • CEAP C4, C5, C6* (see above description)
  • Recurrent venous ulceration
  • Severe post-traumatic and post-fracture edema
  • Severe Post-Thrombotic Syndrome
  • Severe lymphedema after decongestant therapy for reduction maintenance
  • Severe Post-Thrombotic Syndrome
  • Arterial insufficiency, intermittent claudication, ischemia
  • Uncontrolled congestive heart failure
  • Acute dermatitis, weeping dermatosis, cutaneous sepsis
  • Signs of infection
  • Skin sensitivities or allergies
  • Neuropathy
  • Diabetes
  • Confinement to bed or non-ambulatory use unless otherwise prescribed by the physician

Here are signs you need to look out for and which compression amount is appropriate for these conditions.